Overview, Images
Image Collection publication 1 2020. Photograph Lauren Dunn. Courtesy the artists.

The Image Collective

Olga Bennett, Lauren Dunn, Josephine Mead, Annika Koops, Sanja Pahoki, Grace Wood

30 Jun–7 Aug 2021

The collective set out to create new dialogue and discourse with a selection of progressive and diverse contemporary arts, curatorial and academic practices where the central motif of their process of thinking and making is relevant to the politics of the image in its various forms. Our primary interest is to question our contemporary relationship to the image and together develop up to date discourse to share with others to act as an archive as well as stimulate our collective practises.


Image Collective are invested in working through discourses related to the Image, both in the artist’s individual practices and collaborative methodologies. In 2020 they produced a publication and created an online platform titled Dialog that functions as a live working space charting ideas, enquiries, collaborative practice, making, and engagement with shifting grounds of what constitutes the construction, circulation, and status of the Image.

5 ARTISTS - 6 QUESTIONS | Interviews by Sanja Pahoki

One of the ideas behind the formation of the Image Collective was that we would get together regularly, eat some food and chat about stuff. We didn’t get to do that because of lockdowns and restrictions. We had some chats on zoom but it wasn’t the same. There is something about talking about art with food and drink that keeps things loose. In this spirit of looseness and personal connections, and to accompany the exhibition, I chose to ask the artists six questions that I would have liked to answer. These are their responses.

5 ARTISTS - SIX QUESTIONS

Onsite, Exhibition
Overview

The collective set out to create new dialogue and discourse with a selection of progressive and diverse contemporary arts, curatorial and academic practices where the central motif of their process of thinking and making is relevant to the politics of the image in its various forms.

Opening: 1 Jul 2021, 8am–10am

This program takes place on the land of the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation. We recognise that sovereignty was never ceded - this land is stolen land. We pay respects to Wurundjeri Elders, past, present and emerging, to the Elders from other communities and to any other Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islanders who might encounter or participate in the program.

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The Nicholas Building

Room 14, Level 7, 37 Swanston Street

Melbourne, Victoria, 3000

Tuesday – Saturday, 12-6pm
Closed on public holidays
(+61) 3 9650 0093
info@blindside.org.au

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Working on unceded sovereign land of the Wurundjeri and Boon Wurrung people of the Kulin Nation, Blindside pays respect to Elders, past, present and emerging.

Working on unceded sovereign land of the Wurundjeri and Boon Wurrung people of the Kulin Nation, Blindside pays respect to Elders, past, present and emerging.

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